SR22 Insurance

Writing and Writers Weblog

Writing Resources

Best Writing Sites . Famous Quotes

Wednesday, April 14, 2004
 
To All: A reminder

A comma is a comma is a comma. . . (from www.amyfound.org)
A teacher-friend of mine once reminded her students that studying rules of
punctuation is like studying rules of math: they aren’t inventing fresh new ways
to use commas these days. The methods haven’t changed much in the past couple of
centuries.

One source of help for simplifying punctuation rules is Strunk & White’s
Elements of Style. Originally published in 1935 and updated for today’s writers,
this little book deserves a prominent spot on every writer’s desk.

Elements of Style has some handy rules for comma usage, falling into four
categories:

1. In a series of three or more terms with a single conjunction, use a comma
after each term except the last. This is often called the “serial comma.”
For example, write:
apples, oranges, and bananas

2. Enclose parenthetical expressions between commas. Sometimes it is hard to
determine what is a parenthetical expression. If you know it would be inside
parentheses, that would be one example. Elements says, “If the interruption to
the flow of the sentence is but slight, the commas may be safely omitted.”
For example, write:
Kara’s teacher, Mrs. Olson, sent a note home today.
Her uncle, she was happy to say, had arrived for a visit.
Don’t separate a noun from a restrictive term of identification:
Peter the Great
The theologian C.S. Lewis


3. Place a comma before a conjunction introducing an independent clause.
Helicopters arrived in time to rescue the weary hikers, and they were taken to a
hospital for observation.


4. Do not join independent clauses with a comma. Two independent clauses in a
sentence that are not joined by a conjunction must be connected with a
semicolon, not a comma.
The night was incredibly cold; Harold’s fingers began to grow numb.


This sentence could just as easily be made into two complete sentences:
The night was incredibly cold. Harold’s fingers began to grow numb.


If a conjunction is used, a comma is correct.
The night was incredibly cold, and Harold’s fingers began to grow numb.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Put this in your Helpful Help File...so you can refer to it!

Write on

Thelly, the Storylady, Cardiff by the Sea
For a virtual visit go to http://www.lifestorywriting.net/
Join the fun at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lifestory/
For Quiet Moments http://www.gospelcom.net/rbc/odb/odb.shtml
Seeking? http://www.reasons4faith.org/

Monday, April 12, 2004
 
Yahoo! News - EVLiving.com, Your East Valley Community Resource Sponsors Maricopa County Fair

 
Maricopa County Fair

 
EVLiving.com, Your East Valley Community Resource Sponsors Maricopa County Fair

EVLiving.com, Your East Valley Community Resource Sponsors Maricopa County Fair


Powered by Blogger

Christmas Sites

Christmas Quotes Christmas Carols A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Famous People on the Web Go Christmas Trees Christmas Carols Christmas Joy Christmas Gifts Shopping Online Christmas Songs Christmas Search Christmas Humor Christmas Music Christmas Sites Christmas Recipes

Weblogs

Empty Space BillBoard Search Engines - World Search News HTTP in Phoenix AZ World Famous Recipes Christmas Christmas Christmas Daily Bible Verse Jokes and Humor Quotes World Famous Quotes Love Songs Quotes Recipes Jobs and Employment Wireless LAN

Mailing Lists

Famous Quotes Wireless LAN World Famous Recipes

Famous Quotes Famous Quotes Arizona High Tech High Tech Directory Domain Names Famous Quotes Fairy Tales Nursery Rhymes Famous Recipes Bill Austin Chicken Recipes Chicken Recipes Directory Famous Recipes Directory Life Story Writing Network Thelly's Place Life Story Writing Wireless LAN WLAN Christmas Carols Directory Famous Recipes Recipes

Chicken Recipes